Home » Hook » How to Read a Crochet Pattern
| |

How to Read a Crochet Pattern

This post may contain affiliate links, meaning that I may earn a small commission if you make a purchase. See our disclosure policy for more information.

Perhaps the most daunting aspect of mastering crochet is learning how to read a crochet pattern. This article will help you to decipher what exactly it is that that crochet pattern is telling you to do. The best part of crocheting is being able to crochet with confidence!

How to Read a Crochet Pattern

How to Read a Crochet Pattern

Learning how to read a crochet pattern can be intimidating. The good news is that the more you understand, the less frustrated you get, which only makes the journey more rewarding in the end.

First, you’ll need to know the most popular crochet stitches and their abbreviations. You cannot follow a pattern without knowing these, so I have created a handy chart for reference!

Note that these are in US terms (as are all of my patterns), and that UK terms are slightly different. For example in UK terms you are told to “miss” a stitch instead of “skipping” a stitch as we say here in the US. These terms are something to pay particular attention to when purchasing a crochet pattern or even before attempting a free pattern.

Sc = Single Crochet

Dc = Double Crochet

Hdc = Half Double Crochet

Ch = Chain

While there are oodles of more fancy or intricate crochet stitches out there, most of those are made up of a combination of the stitches listed above. Not sure what that abbreviation is? Check the chart! I only use a handful of these stitches regularly, but they are good to know and an essential tool for becoming a master.

Crochet terms abbreviation list

Crochet patterns will either be written in rows for flat projects (like my 2020 washcloth series) or in rounds (for hats like this one, coasters, or amigurumi etc). Most of the crochet patterns here on Heart Hook Home are beginner level or easy, with a few being intermediate or advanced.

One thing you’ll notice when you go to read a crochet pattern is that punctuation is extremely important. Pay attention to commas vs periods, parentheses vs brackets, and particularly pay attention to any text within a set of asterisks. Let’s break this down further.

Dandy Dog Sweater Free crochet pattern

For these examples we will be following my free pattern for the Dandy Dog Sweater. This is particularly helpful because this pattern also has a corresponding video tutorial. In the video I am making the smallest size of the pattern. A good idea would be to follow along with the video while reading the pattern at the same time. See both here.

The Dandy Dog Sweater comes in three sizes – X-Small, Small, and Medium.

1. Parentheses Part One – Sizes

If working a pattern with multiple sizes, you will see parentheses at the beginning of the row/round. The smallest size will always be listed first, the next size up with be listed second, the next size up will be listed third, and so on. For example, taken from row 1 of my Dandy Dog Sweater:

Row 1: Ch- (34, 44, 54), hdc in 2nd chain from hook and in each to end. Join to top of first st with sl st. Stitch count: (33, 43, 53)

In this example the smallest size needs to start with a chain of 34 stitches, the next size up needs to start with a chain of 44 stitches, and the largest size needs to start with a chain of 54 stitches.

2. Parentheses Part Two – Stitch counts

No matter what you’re crocheting, or how large your project is, it is very important to count your stitches at the end of every row/round. Any good pattern will tell you how many stitches you should have at the end of each.

If included they will be in the parenthesis at the end of the row. In this example, we should have 33, 43, or 53 stitches at the end of row 1 – depending on which size you are making.

Row 1: Ch- (34, 44, 54), hdc in 2nd chain from hook and in each to end. Join to top of first st with sl st. Stitch count: (33, 43, 53)

If you miss a stitch, or accidentally make two where there should have been only one, your project may start to look wonky or “grow” on one side. Crochet once and count twice, I always say! This will help you keep on track.

2. Parentheses Part Three – Working into one stitch

Another time you will see parentheses – particularly when in the middle of a row or round – is when you need to work said stitches into just one stitch from the previous row. For example, again taken from the Dandy Dog Sweater:

Row (7, 9, 11): Ch-1, do not turn. (sc, dc) in first st. * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * around, sk next, (sc, dc, sc) in last st. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (35, 45, 55)

The (sc, dc) means that you will put both a single crochet AND a double crochet in the first stitch of that row.

In short, any parentheses at the beginning of a row/round should pertain to the size, any parentheses at the end of the row/round pertain to stitch counts, and any parentheses in the middle of a row means to put all of those stitches into the same stitch.

4. Asterisks

Anything written in between two asterisks means that that particular portion will be repeated. The pattern should tell you how many times to repeat that text, or it may tell you to “repeat to the end of the row”. For example, let’s take a look at the armhole row of the dog sweater – it’s a doozy!

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

This row looks intimidating, so let’s break it down step-by-step…

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

First, we know that we are on row 15 for the smallest size, 19 for the next size up, and row 27 for the largest size.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

We see that we will chain one and turn our work.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

The portion in between the asterisks says to * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next *. This means to skip the next stitch, and place both a single crochet AND a double crochet in the next st.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

Then it tells you to repeat what is between these asterisks (0, 1, 2) more times. The smallest size will not repeat it at all since there is a zero, the next size up will repeat that portion one time (for a total of two times worked), and the largest size says to repeat that portion TWO more times (for a total of three times worked).

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

At this point you should have 2 stitches for the smallest size, 4 stitches for the next size, and 6 stitches for the largest size. Let’s continue…

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

We will skip the next stitch, and single crochet in the next stitch.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

Then you will either chain 7 (smallest size), chain 11 (next size up), or chain 15 (largest size). After you have created this short chain, you will skip either 9 stitches (smallest size), 13 stitches (next size up) or 17 stitches (largest size). This will be your first armhole.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

In the next single crochet you will place BOTH a single crochet and a double crochet.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

Now we see asterisks again, which tells us to repeat that portion – the * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next *– either 10 more times (for smallest size), 11 more times (for next size up), or 17 more times (for largest size).

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

We will skip the next stitch, and single crochet in the next stitch.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

Next we’ll make the second armhole by either chaining 7 (smallest size), chaining 11 (next size up), or chaining 15 (largest size). After you have created this second short chain, you will skip either 9 stitches (smallest size), 13 stitches (next size up) or 17 stitches (largest size). This will be your second armhole.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

In the next single crochet you will place BOTH a single crochet and a double crochet.

Row (15, 19, 27): Ch-1, turn * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * repeat between * * (0, 1, 2) more times. (2, 4, 6 sts total so far). Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * (10, 11, 17) more times. Sk next st, sc in next. Ch-(7, 11, 15), sk-(9, 13, 17) sts. In next sc, place (sc, dc). Repeat between * * to end. Join to top of first sc with sl st. Stitch count: (44, 58, 80)

We see more asterisks, so this means that we will repeat that portion – the * sk next st, (sc, dc) in next * – until we get to the end of the row. When you run out of stitches, you will join to the top of the first single crochet with a slip stitch.

Ta-da!!! We have completed the armhole row! 😅

5. Brackets

Unlike parentheses that mean you’ll work all of the stitches into the same stitch from the previous row, brackets [ ] in a crochet pattern (such as in the Open Ripple Chevron Blanket pattern) mean that everything within those brackets [ ] is worked a set number of times. For example, if you see:

[ch-1, dc in next ch-sp] 5 times

This means that you will do the portion in the brackets five times, but not all in the same stitch. Written out entirely it would look like this:

Chain one, double crochet in the next chain space. Chain one, double crochet in the next chain space. Chain one, double crochet in the next chain space. Chain one, double crochet in the next chain space. Chain one, double crochet in the next chain space.

Ready to try on your own? Head over to the Dandy Dog Sweater pattern with hook and yarn in hand. Watch a bit of the video, pause to read the corresponding portion of the crochet pattern, then crochet it along with me.

I hope this helps you to learn how to read a crochet pattern! If you are having trouble with a Heart Hook Home pattern simply leave a comment or shoot me an email and I’d be happy to help.

Did you also know that hook size and yarn size makes a huge difference in the way your item will turn out? Also, join the Heart Hook Home Crochet Community on Facebook where there are over 65,000 other crocheters!

How to Read a Crochet Pattern

More crochet tips and yarn hacks:

Why Size Matters in Crocheting and Knitting

How to Crochet The Single Crochet (Video Tutorial)

How to Crochet the Double Crochet (Video Tutorial)

Use Industrial Clips for Yarn Bobbins in Crochet and Knitting

How to Soften Economical or Scratchy Yarn

16 Ways to Save at Michaels

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

47 Comments

  1. This is SO helpful but it would be AWESOME if you could make this printable! I print out and enlarge/laminate all my patterns to make them easier to read and more accessible to me without internet. Would love to have this printed out, too! Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge! :)
  2. Thank you for your clarity in giving instructions. I truly appreciate you working this information up into a document that is useful. I have gotten so frustrated when trying to figure out some patterns. Grateful
  3. Hi I trying to crochet a showl & need help with row 3 it says to make a sc in the first ch but I not sure if it is the ch of row 3 or the first ch from row 1 thanks
  4. Hi, Ashlea! I’m 75 (in 8 days), and want to crochet a dog sweater for my small (12#) dog. I used to do basic crocheting, but haven’t crocheted in about 40 years! So, I think I am below a beginner, as I’ve forgotten everything. The sweater pattern I’d like to find would have a neck, cover her chest, have leg holes for her front legs, and then go straight back toward her tail, as if it’s a little skirt. Can you help with a pattern like that. We live in MN, and it’s already -13F here, and she gets cold very easily. Thank you!
    1. Hi! I have 2 dog sweater patterns. There is the Dandy dog sweater which can be found here: https://hearthookhome.com/dog-sweater-crochet-pattern/ and the Stellar dog sweater that can be found here: https://hearthookhome.com/stellar-dog-sweater-crochet-pattern/
  5. Hi, I just read instructions "how to read a pattern" By you. But still confused. I want to make your Painted Canyon Cardigan. read through pattern. Row 1: Fhdc (I will be doing 140. )Row 2: (57,57,57,56,55,54,53,53,53,) So my size is 55? Is this the stitch count total after the Fhdc? Then , Ch 1, turn hdc in each st to end ( 100,105,120,130,140,150,160,175,185) The last in brackets means I will hdc in 140 stitches. Please help before I can get started. I have never seen a pattern wrote this way.
    1. Hi Dawn! So, you will do your foundation row of 140, then rows 2-55 will be the ch 1, turn, hdc in each st to end with a total st count of 140 sts each row. Does that make sense?
  6. I have a pattern saying dc, 9 x dc. I know dc but what is the 9 x dc ? Would this be dc in each stitch or 9 dc in one st ? I don’t understand it. I’ve never had a pattern call for this.
    1. Without knowing what's going on in the previous row, I would think it would be 1 dc in each of the next 9 stitches.
  7. Pingback: Knitting and Crocheting Basics! - Idea Realization Lab at DePaul University
  8. This was a huge help to me. I am a beginner and I'm constantly looking at my work and for some reason it just wasn't coming out right. My other big problem was reading the patterns I have a few patterns and for some reason I just can't understand the pattern. So thank you very much .
  9. Hi, l have downloaded the Easy crochet Dog Sweater for L, XL, and XXL dogs, but I am having trouble with Round 12 for the chest/body. Could you please explain step by step how to do this round? Thanks
    1. Hi Sharron! I just added a video tutorial which should help! You can find it in the post linked here: https://hearthookhome.com/dog-sweater-crochet-pattern/
      1. thank u so much for the video ,its indeed a great project and i am really enjoying making it .I was also stuck so once again thanks for the video
  10. Pattern says Sc in the first 2 stitches, work 2 Sc in the 3rd stitch , REPEAT AROUND. ( 24 ) repeat around is what I don’t understand, can you help me! Thank you so much
    1. Hi Sue! You will repeat the sequence of (sc in next 2 sts, work 2 sc in the next) all the way around. So you are increasing every 3rd stitch. Does this help?
  11. Help. New to following patterns. What does "sc in next st 6 times, sc in next 0 st" mean? I understand the first part, but what is 0 st?
  12. Ashlee .. this email is AMAZING!!!!! I am a 78year old widow, living alone [ so no one can tell me to"GET OFF THAT COMPUTER,,, YOU'VE GOT OTHER WORK TOBE DOINGNOW"!! snce WAS 10 YEARS OLD . I'VE BEENMAKING CLOTHES FOR YOUNG RELATIVES!! I have made all sorts of clothes.. knitted, crocheted, smocked and had embroidered garments for family members … and have never been able to read such a COMPREHENSIVE set of instructions for crochet work...… for all ages as your work here inthese articles for your readers in so many countries!!!! thank YOU SOMUCH FOR DSAHRING YOUR SKILLS WITH US ALL. jENNIFER BOOTHBY , 3 DENE AVENUE, VICTOR HARBOR, SOUTH AUSTRALIA 5211
  13. I don't understand this pattern. It's a Turban Wrap. (Top of Hat) Ch 17. Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each across - 16 sc. Rows 2-18: Ch1, turn, sc in each st across. (Work 1st Side) Ch 17. Row 19: Ch 1, turn, sc in 1st 8 sts, leaving remaining 8 sts unworked. Rows 20-50: Ch1, turn, sc in each st across. Fasten off. (Work 2nd Side.) Row 1: Join yarn with sc in first unworked st following First Side, sc in remaining 7 sts-8sc. My issue is with the (Work 1st Side) instructions. Why am I chaining 17? Am I suppose to chain 17 separately and if so then why? When I look at the Work 2nd side instructions they say to join yarn .... Join what yarn? The 17 chain? I just don't understand this because if I do that then I would have 9 chains unworked across the row. I am ultimately trying to work this piece without having to seem anything together. The picture is at an angle so I can't really see how it ultimately, fully is suppose to look. It just doesn't make sense why I would have to Chain 17 at the top of the instructions for the (Work 1st Side) instructions. Please help. Thank you.
  14. Pingback: Ch 1 How To Crochet | Crochet Terms
  15. Hi, I am working on a beanie pattern that is worked in rounds and would like clarification on the 8th round. It reads: (2dc in next dc, 1dc in each of next 17dc) 0 (4) times, 1dc in each of next 75 (3) dc, 1 hdc in each of next 2dc, 1sc in each of next 2dc, sl st in next dc-80 (84) sts. Clarification is needed on the 0, 4, and 3. Do I repeat what is in parentheses 0 or 4 times? What is the (3) for? Thanks so much.
  16. Pingback: New How to Read a Crochet Pattern hearthookhome.com…… | Patterns Cozydesign
  17. Bless your heart for making this a photo. So easy touch-hold and save image pops up! I can send it easily in an email or message.
  18. I am having a lot of trouble with blouse patterns they just don't seem to come out right. I don't know if I am not reading the patterns right or what it is but my finished products are unwareable.please help. Anna
  19. Thank you for the helpful information. The thing that I am having trouble understanding the the "graph" diagrams. Reading a pattern is the way I learned back in the day, like your chart of symbols. Now to see directions that look like commas, lines, etc. is beyond my understanding. Any suggestions for me? Thank you.
  20. How lovely is your work! I'm loving every detail you shared! I'm really happy to see people sharing the art of crochet. ;) <3
  21. Thank U for this web site , having trouble with this pattern - - Old World Fisherman pattern. can you help me?.
  22. Hey Ashley i was given some lion brand yarn and it 100% acrylic. I am not sure what to do with it every time I try to make something with it the yarn get attached to itself. Any suggestion. The yarn is beautiful it is called Boardwalk Promendade.
    1. Hey! I love and hate that yarn. ha! :( It's very hard to frog (rip out) and it does stick to itself. Try keeping your working yarn (from the skein) as far away from the rest of it as possible. That's all I got. But it is pretty!!
  23. Pingback: Foundation Single Crochet: How to Video + Why You Need to Learn
  24. Pingback: Felting Tutorial: How to Felt Wool (with or without a washing machine)
  25. Pingback: Messy Mom Bun Beanie Crochet Pattern
  26. Pingback: Dragon Tears Purse 3-in-1 Crochet Pattern (Coin, Clutch or Full Size!)
  27. Hi Ashley, thanks for the info I have found this really helpful. I am teaching myself how to crochet and have been working on squares to get to grips with the different stitches and am now thinking of taking on something a bit more advanced, like a jumper. But I am left handed, so, I am concerned that anything that I make will be the wrong way round! As I will be working left to right on my crocheting not right to left. What do you think? should I just carry on or do I need to re-teach myself on my right hand!? Not! haha. Thanks :D
    1. For the most part everything is the same. I follow patterns pretty much exactly the only time I ever find something tricky is every once in a while a certain style of booties or when attaching a strap to a bootie I have to remember to go the opposite direction when counting out where to attach. But basically everything is the same.
  28. Pingback: Video Tutorial: How to Crochet the Half Double Crochet
  29. Hi, I recently purchased your pattern for the Dragon tears fingerless gloves and I am stuck on row 4....please help. The directions indicate to " *2dc in center of next v-st" i have searched my crochet reference book and cannot figure out what a "v-st" is can you please clarify. Thanks!
    1. Hello! In the first photo of the tutorial, the photo shows 12 V sts. They look like little Vs. If that doesn't help, let me know! Thanks
    2. Hello! First, I love you work! You are so stinking talented! I recently purchased the messybun beanie pattern. I have attempted the adult size small a few times now but I am having a problem with it being really loose. Its almost like its just laying on my head & if the wind blew it would flop right off lol. Any tips on how to tighten and give it that snug feeling like when you put a hat on?
      1. Hey! Are you working with an H hook? You could go down to a G, and/or stop increasing at 60 sts instead. If you want to tighten up the one you have finished, you could reattach the yarn with a smaller hook and do a sc row or two around the brim. Keep me posted!